Corrections for Mark

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Corrections for Mark

Brian J. Henry
Chapters 1-4

1:4 John the Baptizer appeared in the wilderness, proclaiming a baptism <on> [of] repentance<,> for the forgiveness of sins.
In verses 1:16, 2:13, 3:7, 4:1, 5:1, and throughout the rest of Mark it seems, "Sea" is always capitalized and it shouldn't be.
1:27 They were all so amazed that they kept asking each other: “What is this<? What is this strange teaching?> [, a new kind of teaching?] He gives his commands with authority even to the foul spirits, and they obey him!”
1:29  As soon as they had left the synagogue, they went<, with James and John, in> to the house of Simon and Andrew[, along with James and John].
1:35 In the morning, long before daylight, Jesus <rose and went out, and, going> [got up and went out] to a lonely spot, [and] there began to pray
2:16 When the teachers of the Law belonging to the party of the Pharisees saw that he was eating in the company of such people, they said to his disciples: “[Why does he eat with the] <He is eating in the company of> tax-gatherers and outcasts<!>[?]”
3:4 and to the people he said: “Is it <allowable>[permissible, permitted, lawful?] to do good at the Sabbath — or harm? To save a life, or destroy it?”
3:21  When his <relations>[relatives, own people, family] heard of it, they went to take charge of him, for they said that he was out of his mind.
3:27  “No man who has got[ten] into a strong man's house can carry off his goods, without first <securing him>[tying him up]; and not until then will he plunder his house.
4:37 A violent <squall>[gale of wind, windstorm] came on, and the waves kept dashing into the boat, so that the boat was <actually filling> [nearly swamped].
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Re: Corrections for Mark

Brian J. Henry
Chapters 5-8

5:22-23  One of the leaders of the synagogue, whose name was <Jaeirus>[Jairus], came and, as soon as he saw Jesus, threw himself at his feet <with repeated entreaties.>[and begged him repeatedly, saying  “My little daughter<,” he said, “> is at the point of death¹; < I beg you to> [please] come and place your hands on her so that <her life may be spared> [she may recover and live].”
¹A. Nyland translates this as "at death's door," which I think works well.

5:29, 34 complaint > affliction

5:41 Taking her hand, Jesus said to her: “<Taleitha>[Talitha], koum!” — which means ‘little girl, I am speaking to you — Rise!’
6:3  Is not¹ he the carpenter, the son of Mary, and the brother of James, and Joses, and Judas, and Simon? And are not¹ his sisters, too, living here among us?” This proved a hindrance to their believing in him;
¹Should we go with contractions here, following NET and Nyland? I noticed a few "don'ts" later on.
6:4  at which Jesus said: “A prophet is not without honor, except in his <own country>[hometown]¹, and among his own <relations>[kin (NRSV), relatives (ESV, NET)], and in his own home.”
¹also in 6:1
6:38 “How many loaves have you?” he asked; “Go, and see.” When they had found out, they told him: “Five, and two <fishes>[fish].”
7:15, 18 external > outside

8:31 councilors > elders (NRSV, NET, NIV) this looks like it's a consistent thing throughout.

8:34 Calling the people and his disciples to him, Jesus said: “If anyone wishes to walk in my steps, <let them renounce self>[they must deny themselves], take up their cross, and follow me.
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Re: Corrections for Mark

russellallen
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In reply to this post by Brian J. Henry
Hey,

On 09/04/2013, at 10:28 AM, bottleofink [via Open English Bible] <[hidden email]> wrote:

Chapters 1-4

1:4 John the Baptizer appeared in the wilderness, proclaiming a baptism <on> [of] repentance<,> for the forgiveness of sins.
We had an earlier inconclusive discussion about this https://github.com/openenglishbible/Open-English-Bible/issues/277

I suppose my main worry is that the phrase "baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins" is pretty meaningless in itself. Obviously we all ascribe meaning to it because we have heard sermons and read theological musings etc. But the actual words, shorn of previous knowledge are pretty opaque.

New translations such as the CEB seem to be trying to go for more clarity by dropping succinctness and not using the latinate 'repentance': John was in the wilderness calling for people to be baptized to show that they were changing their hearts and lives and wanted God to forgive their sins. 

If we want to be closer to the Grk, there is the REB: John the Baptist appeared in the wilderness proclaiming a baptism in token of repentance, for the forgiveness of sins

On the other hand, maybe this is one phrase not to bother translating and just to put the traditional phrase?

There's a discussion by Nida of this phrase at:

In verses 1:16, 2:13, 3:7, 4:1, 5:1, and throughout the rest of Mark it seems, "Sea" is always capitalized and it shouldn't be.

Done
1:27 They were all so amazed that they kept asking each other: “What is this<? What is this strange teaching?> [, a new kind of teaching?] He gives his commands with authority even to the foul spirits, and they obey him!”
Done
1:29  As soon as they had left the synagogue, they went<, with James and John, in> to the house of Simon and Andrew[, along with James and John].
Done
1:35 In the morning, long before daylight, Jesus <rose and went out, and, going> [got up and went out] to a lonely spot, [and] there began to pray
Done
2:16 When the teachers of the Law belonging to the party of the Pharisees saw that he was eating in the company of such people, they said to his disciples: “[Why does he eat with the] <He is eating in the company of> tax-gatherers and outcasts<!>[?]”
Done
3:4 and to the people he said: “Is it <allowable>[permissible, permitted, lawful?] to do good at the Sabbath — or harm? To save a life, or destroy it?”
I'm not sure any of these are better than the others. 
3:21  When his <relations>[relatives, own people, family] heard of it, they went to take charge of him, for they said that he was out of his mind.
I wonder if this is a UK english thing. 

Anyway, family is the most common translation. The UBS translation handbook says in part:

hoi par’ autou literally ‘those along with him’: this idiom may mean ‘his followers,’ ‘his friends,’ or ‘his family.’ AV, ASV, RSV prefer ‘his friends’; it would seem, however that ‘his family,’ ‘his relatives’ is what is indicated, in the light of vv 31ff. (cf. Arndt & Gingrich para I.4.b.b; Moulton & Milligan; Moule Idiom Book, 52; Field Notes, 25f.): this rendering is adopted by Manson, Moffatt, Goodspeed, Weymouth, BFBS, Brazilian, Synodale ...  It would seem from the context that a somewhat more intimate group than ‘friends’ were those so concerned about Jesus’ health as the result of his being constantly with the thronging crowd. Accordingly, one may use ‘those of his household’ (a common equivalent of family and relatives) or ‘those who were close to him’ (a close rendering of the Greek phrase). Indonesian and Javanese render ‘his blood-relations.’

BDAG says "The Koine also uses this expr. to denote others who are intimately connected w. someone, e.g. family, relatives"

My only concern with family is the possibility that Western readers will think 'nuclear family', but 'those of his household' sounds a bit strange and I agree we can improve on 'relations'.

How about 'relatives'?

3:27  “No man who has got[ten] into a strong man's house can carry off his goods, without first <securing him>[tying him up]; and not until then will he plunder his house.

Gotten v Got is, as they say, above my pay scale :) Got sounds right to me personally but I presume it is a US thing.

How about: No man who has broken into a strong man's house can carry off his goods, without first tying him up; and not until then will he plunder his house.
4:37 A violent <squall>[gale of wind, windstorm] came on, and the waves kept dashing into the boat, so that the boat was <actually filling> [nearly swamped].
Is your objection to squall just that the word is too high level or that you see a meaning difference?



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Re: Corrections for Mark

russellallen
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In reply to this post by Brian J. Henry

On 10/04/2013, at 2:20 PM, bottleofink [via Open English Bible] <[hidden email]> wrote:

Chapters 5-8

5:22-23  One of the leaders of the synagogue, whose name was <Jaeirus>[Jairus], came and, as soon as he saw Jesus, threw himself at his feet <with repeated entreaties.>[and begged him repeatedly, saying  “My little daughter<,” he said, “> is at the point of death¹; < I beg you to> [please] come and place your hands on her so that <her life may be spared> [she may recover and live].”
¹A. Nyland translates this as "at death's door," which I think works well.

Nice.

5:29, 34 complaint > affliction

Done
5:41 Taking her hand, Jesus said to her: “<Taleitha>[Talitha], koum!” — which means ‘little girl, I am speaking to you — Rise!’

Done

6:3  Is not¹ he the carpenter, the son of Mary, and the brother of James, and Joses, and Judas, and Simon? And are not¹ his sisters, too, living here among us?” This proved a hindrance to their believing in him;
¹Should we go with contractions here, following NET and Nyland? I noticed a few "don'ts" later on.

This is cumbersome, is it not. 
6:4  at which Jesus said: “A prophet is not without honor, except in his <own country>[hometown]¹, and among his own <relations>[kin (NRSV), relatives (ESV, NET)], and in his own home.”
¹also in 6:1

Relations should be now relatives throughout.

6:38 “How many loaves have you?” he asked; “Go, and see.” When they had found out, they told him: “Five, and two <fishes>[fish].”
I wonder when it changed. Wiktionary informs me that 'fishes' is only found in US, which clearly can't be right (or wasn't right in 1904).  Anyway, changed throughout.
7:15, 18 external > outside

External sounds pretty natural to me. Does it sound wrong to you?

8:31 councilors > elders (NRSV, NET, NIV) this looks like it's a consistent thing throughout.

Yeah. Almost everyone goes with 'elders'.

I can only find CEV: 'nation's leaders', GWORD 'leaders'.

We should probably join the herd. 

8:34 Calling the people and his disciples to him, Jesus said: “If anyone wishes to walk in my steps, <let them renounce self>[they must deny themselves], take up their cross, and follow me.
'Renounce self' actually is also in the REB. They must have taken it from the TCNT :)

Can't say I really like either that or 'deny themselves'

UBS say: 

Deny himself is without doubt one of the most difficult expressions in all of Mark to translate adequately. Unfortunately, too many people have taken this expression to mean ‘to deny oneself certain pleasures or objects,’ while actually the meaning is a denial of one’s own presumed prerogatives or personal interests. The different ways of expressing this concept in various languages are highly illuminating, e.g. ‘to not accept self’ (Tetelcingo Aztec), ‘to forget self’ (Ifugao, Bolivian Quechua), ‘to have no regard for oneself’ (Barrow Eskimo), ‘not bother oneself about oneself’ (South Toradja), ‘to cover up oneself’ (Mazatec), ‘to not worship oneself’ (Mixtec), ‘to stop doing what one’s own heart wants’ (Tzeltal), ‘to not belong to oneself any longer’ (Conob), ‘to let go that which he wants to do himself’ (Kiyaka), ‘says, I will not do just what I want to do’ (Cashibo), ‘to let him say, I do not serve for anything,’ in the sense of having no personal value (Tzotzil), ‘to not do what is passing through his mind’ (Putu), ‘to not take constant thought for himself’ (Mazahua), ‘to quit what he himself wants’ (Chontal of Tabasco), ‘to undo one’s own way of thinking’ (Totonac), ‘to put his own things down’ (Gio), ‘to despise himself’ (Kekchi), ‘to refuse himself’ (Kituba), ‘to turn his back on himself’ (Javanese), ‘to disobey himself,’ in the sense of denying one’s own wishes (Black Bobo), ‘to leave himself at the side’ (Huastec), ‘to leave his own way’ (Trique), ‘to take his mind out of himself completely’ (Loma), ‘to say, I do not live for myself’ (Huanuco Quechua), and ‘to say No to oneself’ (Mitla Zapotec).

NLT's "you must turn from your selfish ways" isn't really enough.
GWord's "those who want to follow me must say no to the things they want" is I think wrong.

The Good News Bible I like: "you must forget yourself"

Thoughts?


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Re: Corrections for Mark

Brian J. Henry
In reply to this post by russellallen
russellallen wrote
> 1:4 John the Baptizer appeared in the wilderness, proclaiming a baptism <on> [of] repentance<,> for the forgiveness of sins.
We had an earlier inconclusive discussion about this https://github.com/openenglishbible/Open-English-Bible/issues/277

I suppose my main worry is that the phrase "baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins" is pretty meaningless in itself. Obviously we all ascribe meaning to it because we have heard sermons and read theological musings etc. But the actual words, shorn of previous knowledge are pretty opaque.

New translations such as the CEB seem to be trying to go for more clarity by dropping succinctness and not using the latinate 'repentance': John was in the wilderness calling for people to be baptized to show that they were changing their hearts and lives and wanted God to forgive their sins.

If we want to be closer to the Grk, there is the REB: John the Baptist appeared in the wilderness proclaiming a baptism in token of repentance, for the forgiveness of sins

On the other hand, maybe this is one phrase not to bother translating and just to put the traditional phrase?

There's a discussion by Nida of this phrase at:
http://www.ubs-translations.org/tbt/1952/03/TBT195203.html?num=98&x=0&y=0&num1=
Baptism "on" repentance sounded so foreign I just thought it was a typo, haha, my mistake. I'm not really sure what to do here then. I don't mind the traditional phrase.
> 3:4 and to the people he said: “Is it <allowable>[permissible, permitted, lawful?] to do good at the Sabbath — or harm? To save a life, or destroy it?”
I'm not sure any of these are better than the others.
Allowable just seems like an awkward word here, maybe it's just me.
> 3:21  When his <relations>[relatives, own people, family] heard of it, they went to take charge of him, for they said that he was out of his mind.

I wonder if this is a UK english thing.

Anyway, family is the most common translation. The UBS translation handbook says in part:

hoi par’ autou literally ‘those along with him’: this idiom may mean ‘his followers,’ ‘his friends,’ or ‘his family.’ AV, ASV, RSV prefer ‘his friends’; it would seem, however that ‘his family,’ ‘his relatives’ is what is indicated, in the light of vv 31ff. (cf. Arndt & Gingrich para I.4.b.b; Moulton & Milligan; Moule Idiom Book, 52; Field Notes, 25f.): this rendering is adopted by Manson, Moffatt, Goodspeed, Weymouth, BFBS, Brazilian, Synodale ... It would seem from the context that a somewhat more intimate group than ‘friends’ were those so concerned about Jesus’ health as the result of his being constantly with the thronging crowd. Accordingly, one may use ‘those of his household’ (a common equivalent of family and relatives) or ‘those who were close to him’ (a close rendering of the Greek phrase). Indonesian and Javanese render ‘his blood-relations.’

BDAG says "The Koine also uses this expr. to denote others who are intimately connected w. someone, e.g. family, relatives"

My only concern with family is the possibility that Western readers will think 'nuclear family', but 'those of his household' sounds a bit strange and I agree we can improve on 'relations'.

How about 'relatives'?
Relatives is good!
> 3:27  “No man who has got[ten] into a strong man's house can carry off his goods, without first <securing him>[tying him up]; and not until then will he plunder his house.

Gotten v Got is, as they say, above my pay scale :) Got sounds right to me personally but I presume it is a US thing.

How about: No man who has broken into a strong man's house can carry off his goods, without first tying him up; and not until then will he plunder his house.
Haha, yes, that works.
 
> 4:37 A violent <squall>[gale of wind, windstorm] came on, and the waves kept dashing into the boat, so that the boat was <actually filling> [nearly swamped].
Is your objection to squall just that the word is too high level or that you see a meaning difference?
The high level. I'm not sure I've ever heard that word outside of the Bible and other poetry. I don't have a strong objection to it, it just caught my eye, so I figured I'd make a suggestion.

> 7:15, 18 external > outside

External sounds pretty natural to me. Does it sound wrong to you?
Yeah, I mean it's understandable, but it definitely doesn't sound natural to me.

> 8:34 Calling the people and his disciples to him, Jesus said: “If anyone wishes to walk in my steps, <let them renounce self>[they must deny themselves], take up their cross, and follow me.
'Renounce self' actually is also in the REB. They must have taken it from the TCNT :)

Can't say I really like either that or 'deny themselves'

UBS say:

        Deny himself is without doubt one of the most difficult expressions in all of Mark to translate adequately. Unfortunately, too many people have taken this expression to mean ‘to deny oneself certain pleasures or objects,’ while actually the meaning is a denial of one’s own presumed prerogatives or personal interests. The different ways of expressing this concept in various languages are highly illuminating, e.g. ‘to not accept self’ (Tetelcingo Aztec), ‘to forget self’ (Ifugao, Bolivian Quechua), ‘to have no regard for oneself’ (Barrow Eskimo), ‘not bother oneself about oneself’ (South Toradja), ‘to cover up oneself’ (Mazatec), ‘to not worship oneself’ (Mixtec), ‘to stop doing what one’s own heart wants’ (Tzeltal), ‘to not belong to oneself any longer’ (Conob), ‘to let go that which he wants to do himself’ (Kiyaka), ‘says, I will not do just what I want to do’ (Cashibo), ‘to let him say, I do not serve for anything,’ in the sense of having no personal value (Tzotzil), ‘to not do what is passing through his mind’ (Putu), ‘to not take constant thought for himself’ (Mazahua), ‘to quit what he himself wants’ (Chontal of Tabasco), ‘to undo one’s own way of thinking’ (Totonac), ‘to put his own things down’ (Gio), ‘to despise himself’ (Kekchi), ‘to refuse himself’ (Kituba), ‘to turn his back on himself’ (Javanese), ‘to disobey himself,’ in the sense of denying one’s own wishes (Black Bobo), ‘to leave himself at the side’ (Huastec), ‘to leave his own way’ (Trique), ‘to take his mind out of himself completely’ (Loma), ‘to say, I do not live for myself’ (Huanuco Quechua), and ‘to say No to oneself’ (Mitla Zapotec).

NLT's "you must turn from your selfish ways" isn't really enough.
GWord's "those who want to follow me must say no to the things they want" is I think wrong.

The Good News Bible I like: "you must forget yourself"

Thoughts?
I like how the Good News Bible puts it as well. The language examples got me interested, in Japanese it's a stronger "they must abandon themselves," but I think "forget" might be a bit more understandable.
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Re: Corrections for Mark

Brian J. Henry
In reply to this post by Brian J. Henry
Chapters 9-12

9:3  and his clothes became <of a more >dazzling white[, more so] than any <bleacher>[launderer] in the world could make them.
"Bleacher" sounds weird to me. Not sure I've ever heard that applied to a person.
NRSV: "as no one on earth could bleach them"
NET: "more so than any launderer in the world could bleach them."
Nyland: "whiter than any launderer in the whole world could bleach them."
9:9 ...Jesus cautioned them not to relate what they had seen to anyone, until after the Son of Man <should have>[had] risen <again> from the dead.
9:17  “Teacher,” answered a man in the crowd, “I brought my son to see you, as he has a <dumb> spirit in him[ that makes him mute];
9:36  Then Jesus took a little child, and placed it in the middle of them. <Folding>[Taking] it in his arms, he said to them:
10:16  Then he <folded>[took] the children in his arms, and, placing his hands on them, gave them his blessing.
Alternatively, Dr. Nyland, the CEB, and a few others go with embracing/embraced.
10:13  Some of the people were bringing little children to Jesus, for him to touch them; but the disciples <found fault with>[rebuked] those who had brought them.
10:21  Jesus looked at the man, and his heart went out to him, and he said: “There is still one thing wanting in you; go and sell all that you have, and give to the poor, and you will <heave>[have] wealth in heaven; then come and follow me.”
10:30  who will not receive a hundred times as much, even now in the present — houses, and brothers, and sisters, and mothers, and children, and land <—>[,] though not without persecutions<,>[—] and<,> in the age that is coming, eternal life.
10:49  Then Jesus stopped. “Call him,” he said. So they called the blind man. “<Courage>!” they exclaimed. “Get up; he is calling you.”  
NET goes with "have courage," NRSV, "take heart," and Nyland + NIV, "cheer up!"
12:13  Afterward they sent to Jesus some of the Pharisees and <of the> Herodians, to set a trap for him in the course of conversation.
12:28  Then came up one of the teachers of the Law who had heard their discussions. Knowing that Jesus had answered them wisely, he asked him this question: “<What>[Which commandment] is the <first>[most important] of all< the commandments>?”
12:29  “The <first>[most important*],” answered Jesus, “is ..... 31  The second [most important(?)] is this — ‘You must love your neighbor as you love yourself.’ There is no commandment greater than these.”
*or perhaps "first and most important," which would leave no need to add anything to "the second is this."
NET, NIV say "Most important, second is this," while CEV, Nyland go with "Most important, second most important."
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Re: Corrections for Mark

Brian J. Henry
In reply to this post by Brian J. Henry
Chapters 13-16

13:14  “As soon, however, as you see ‘the Foul Desecration’ standing where <he>[it] ought not”
14:29  “Even if everyone else falls away,” said Peter, “<yet> I will not.”
14:38  Watch and pray,” he said to them all, “so that you may not fall into temptation. True, the spirit is eager, but human nature is weak.”
"the spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak" is so ingrained in our culture, and the meaning isn't really significantly clarified here. NET, NASB, and NIV all go with this, with ESV/NRSV adding "indeed is willing." Just a thought. It also avoids the use of "nature" for sarx which can be a touchy subject generally.

15:18  and then began to salute him. “<Long life to you>[Hail (NET, NRSV), greetings (Nyland), Long live the (NET footnote)] king of the Jews!” they said.
15:37  But Jesus, giving a loud cry, <expired>[breathed his last (NET, NRSV, NIV, Nyland)].
15:39  The Roman officer, who was standing facing Jesus, on seeing the way in which he <expired>[breathed his last], exclaimed: “This man must indeed have been ‘God's Son’!”
15:41  all of whom used to accompany Jesus when he was in Galilee, and <attend on him>[give him support (NET), provided for him (NRSV, Nyland)] — besides many other women who had come up with him to Jerusalem.
At very least, change it to "attend to him."

Aaaand that's all for Mark.
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Re: Corrections for Mark

russellallen
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On 27/04/2013, at 10:00 AM, Brian J. Henry [via Open English Bible] <[hidden email]> wrote:

Chapters 13-16

13:14  “As soon, however, as you see ‘the Foul Desecration’ standing where <he>[it] ought not”
OK
14:29  “Even if everyone else falls away,” said Peter, “<yet> I will not.”
OK
14:38  Watch and pray,” he said to them all, “so that you may not fall into temptation. True, the spirit is eager, but human nature is weak.”
"the spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak" is so ingrained in our culture, and the meaning isn't really significantly clarified here. NET, NASB, and NIV all go with this, with ESV/NRSV adding "indeed is willing." Just a thought. It also avoids the use of "nature" for sarx which can be a touchy subject generally.

I see your point. It feels like a bit of a cop out, but you're right.

For interest, UBS says:

The spirit…the flesh is a fundamental contrast, but one which is variously expressed in different languages. Often, however, spirit is equivalent to ‘heart’ (Eastern Otomi, Loma, Amuzgo, Sierra Aztec), and flesh may be rendered as ‘body’ (Amuzgo, Sierra Aztec, Tzeltal), ‘you yourself’ (Tarahumara). The following translations are illustrative of the contrastive expressions: ‘your hearts are ready but your bodies are weak’ (Sierra Aztec), ‘your heart is strong but you yourselves are not strong’ (Tarahumara), ‘your heart has strength, but your body does not have strength’ (Tzeltal), ‘your heart desires to do good, but your heart is weak,’ in which ‘heart’ must be used in both clauses since it not only stands for the center of the personality, but is also the symbol of typical human nature (Loma).
15:18  and then began to salute him. “<Long life to you>[Hail (NET, NRSV), greetings (Nyland), Long live the (NET footnote)] king of the Jews!” they said.
CEV has "Hey, you king of the Jews" which makes me laugh!  Oi, you!

I'm inclined to leave this as I'm not convinced of the options. Hail is pretty generic and doesn't communicate much, Greetings sounds more like Mr Spock. This may just be me :)

Both Good News Bible and GWord match us, so we're not unjustifiable meaning-wise.

15:37  But Jesus, giving a loud cry, <expired>[breathed his last (NET, NRSV, NIV, Nyland)].
OK
15:39  The Roman officer, who was standing facing Jesus, on seeing the way in which he <expired>[breathed his last], exclaimed: “This man must indeed have been ‘God's Son’!”
OK
15:41  all of whom used to accompany Jesus when he was in Galilee, and <attend on him>[give him support (NET), provided for him (NRSV, Nyland)] — besides many other women who had come up with him to Jerusalem.
At very least, change it to "attend to him."

I like give him support. Let's do that.

Aaaand that's all for Mark.

Yay!



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Re: Corrections for Mark

russellallen
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In reply to this post by Brian J. Henry
Onwards and upwards! 

On 17/04/2013, at 1:34 PM, Brian J. Henry [via Open English Bible] <[hidden email]> wrote:

Chapters 9-12

9:3  and his clothes became <of a more >dazzling white[, more so] than any <bleacher>[launderer] in the world could make them.
"Bleacher" sounds weird to me. Not sure I've ever heard that applied to a person.
NRSV: "as no one on earth could bleach them"
NET: "more so than any launderer in the world could bleach them."
Nyland: "whiter than any launderer in the whole world could bleach them."


Okay dokay!

9:9 ...Jesus cautioned them not to relate what they had seen to anyone, until after the Son of Man <should have>[had] risen <again> from the dead.

OK
9:17  “Teacher,” answered a man in the crowd, “I brought my son to see you, as he has a <dumb> spirit in him[ that makes him mute];
OK
9:36  Then Jesus took a little child, and placed it in the middle of them. <Folding>[Taking] it in his arms, he said to them:
OK
10:16  Then he <folded>[took] the children in his arms, and, placing his hands on them, gave them his blessing.
Alternatively, Dr. Nyland, the CEB, and a few others go with embracing/embraced.

Embrace probably works better in English as being a less continuous event. I wonder if we could get away with hugged :)
10:13  Some of the people were bringing little children to Jesus, for him to touch them; but the disciples <found fault with>[rebuked] those who had brought them.

OK
10:21  Jesus looked at the man, and his heart went out to him, and he said: “There is still one thing wanting in you; go and sell all that you have, and give to the poor, and you will <heave>[have] wealth in heaven; then come and follow me.”
Heaving wealth in heaven gives rise to images of spending eternity shovelling gold coins :)
10:30  who will not receive a hundred times as much, even now in the present — houses, and brothers, and sisters, and mothers, and children, and land <—>[,] though not without persecutions<,>[—] and<,> in the age that is coming, eternal life.

OK
10:49  Then Jesus stopped. “Call him,” he said. So they called the blind man. “<Courage>!” they exclaimed. “Get up; he is calling you.”  
NET goes with "have courage," NRSV, "take heart," and Nyland + NIV, "cheer up!"

Let's go with have courage
12:13  Afterward they sent to Jesus some of the Pharisees and <of the> Herodians, to set a trap for him in the course of conversation.
OK
12:28  Then came up one of the teachers of the Law who had heard their discussions. Knowing that Jesus had answered them wisely, he asked him this question: “<What>[Which commandment] is the <first>[most important] of all< the commandments>?”
12:29  “The <first>[most important*],” answered Jesus, “is ..... 31  The second [most important(?)] is this — ‘You must love your neighbor as you love yourself.’ There is no commandment greater than these.”
*or perhaps "first and most important," which would leave no need to add anything to "the second is this."
NET, NIV say "Most important, second is this," while CEV, Nyland go with "Most important, second most important."

I think Most important, second is clear enough, and shorter.



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