Merry Christmas Translation for 2016

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Merry Christmas Translation for 2016

Timchambers
My yearly Christmas translation....each year I try to find an Advent/Christmas themed verse to translate:

Gal 4:4-5 Currently read:

 4 but, when the full time came, God sent his Son – born a woman’s child, born subject to Law – 5 To ransom those who were subject to Law, so that we might take our position as sons.


Consider changing to:

 4 but, when the fully right time had come, God sent on his Son – born of a woman, born subject to Law, 5 to rescue those who were subject to Law, so that we might experience adoption as sons.


Hope you all have a blessed Christmas!
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Re: Merry Christmas Translation for 2016

Israel Rhoden
Hi Tim,

I enjoy reading your translations. If its not too much trouble, in the future, I wonder if you would mind pasting the greek as well.

I suggest this, as often your posts pop up while I am on my phone while I am out and about, or in some situation where I don't have my greek bible. If the greek was there as well, I wouldn't have to put off responding until I get back to my desk to pull out the greek bible.

Merry Christmas, and God bless.
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Re: Merry Christmas Translation for 2016

Israel Rhoden
In reply to this post by Timchambers
What was the reasoning for adding "on" to the phrase "God sent on his Son". On is not in the greek, and adding it to the phrase itself sounds weird to my Australian ear, but that could be just me.

I also like "born of a woman" better—it is more literal, yet still plain English.

Personally I dont like "rescue", but I do agree it may be appropriate to use a different word. Personally I feel "redeem" may work better, as "redeem" still implies a sense of liberation in exchange for something (BDAG implies the word does have a strong sense of "liberation" and "buying off")

Im not sure "experience" is the best translation, as the word itself implies both a literal sense of "receiving" something or "getting back what was lost"
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Re: Merry Christmas Translation for 2016

Timchambers
In reply to this post by Israel Rhoden
Sure I'll post a link to the greek interlinear results I use when I post suggestions. Good idea.... - Tim

Here it is for this one: https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Gal%204%3A4-5%20&version=MOUNCE

To your question of why I did "sent on his son" it was an attempt at translating this:

ἐξαποστέλλω (exapostellō) which strong's lexicon lists as: "to send away forth, i.e. (on a mission) to despatch, or (peremptorily) to dismiss:—send (away, forth, out)."

It does seem to incude a directional aspect to the "sending" - but "away" "out" and even "fourth" seemed awkward in this context of God sending his Son. "Sending on" seemed to capture this idea of a direction, but not implying that God sent his son "away" or "out" which had other implications not clearly in the original.  

Very open to other ideas. If there was a word that captured the idea of "send on a mission" that would seem to be the fit to the first section of Strong's. But I couldn't come up with that so far.
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Re: Merry Christmas Translation for 2016

Israel Rhoden
BDAG suggests the following (pertinent) usages:

1. to send someone off to a locality or on a mission, send away, send off, send out.
3. to send someth. off in an official sense, send, dispatch.

BDAG lists Gal 4:4 as an example of usage 1.

Personally, to my Australian, "Sent on" doesn't convey a sense of sending on a mission, it actually conveys a concept of rejection, i.e. "He wanted to enter that building but the security guard sent him on his way."  If we need to express the ἐξ I would prefer "sent out" over "sent on". But I personally feel like this is a context where it might not be possible to explicitly convey the ἐξ, which I am happy with given the idea of "sending" usually implies a sender that is doing the dispatching.

This is why bible translation committees need more than two people right. If two people disagree, you need a deciding vote :D (Thankfully we have one)