Small correction on Romans

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Small correction on Romans

Brian J. Henry
10:8
No, but what does it say? ['The message is near you, on your lips and in your heart' (which means] <‘T> [t]he message of faith<’> which we proclaim[);] <.>
It appears the scripture quotation got taken out somehow. In the original TCNT it appears as
No, but what does it say? 'The Message is near thee; it is on thy lips and in thy heart'—which means 'The Message of Faith' which we proclaim.
Though, I think the majority translation "that is," is preferable to our "which means" which is used throughout 10.6-8, but that could just be because I'm so used to hearing it that way.
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Re: Small correction on Romans

Brian J. Henry
Oops, I put that in parentheses, but that's not consistent with the rest of the passage. I think parentheses are cleaner here than dashes though (following NET, NRSV, NIV, and more).
Also, the quotation marks are backwards in this section (corrected below).
10:6 But the righteousness which results from faith finds expression in these words: "Do not say to yourself 'Who will go up into heaven?'" (which means to bring Christ down) 7 "or 'Who will go down into the depths below?'" (which means to bring Christ up from the dead). 8 No, but what does it say? 'The message is near you, on your lips and in your heart' (which means the message of faith which we proclaim);
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Re: Small correction on Romans

Timchambers
Looks good to me... Tim
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Re: Small correction on Romans

Coburn
In reply to this post by Brian J. Henry
I've been concerned with the baptism problem ever since I heard about it over at Dr. Mounce's college, some thirty years ago. Supposedly the translators of the Authorised Version opted for the neologism "baptism" over the common-sense equivalent "immersion (N.T. Wright, "plunged")" because it was politically correct. The state church at the time practiced sprinkling of infants.

In the same way, we use words like "righteousness" and "faith," but such language is ecclesiastical coin, Temple money, and it is not legal tender for other debts. I am struggling, and have been struggling, to find modern English equivalents for "the world come of age." In approaching the work of the OEB, the problem is compounded by the tendency to use semi-formal, poetic language, rather than Wright's more informal tone, which I find easier.

So I would take this small correction one step further. I would suggest saying something like: But the good standing which comes through trust expresses itself this way..."
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